The legacy of migration: IRiS seminar series

The programme for IRiS seminar series for the first term of the new academic year is now available. We start on 22nd October at 2pm with Professor Gracia Liu-Farrer of Waseda University, Japan. She will present a paper based on her forthcoming book on Immigrant Japan: Mobility and Belonging in an Ethno-nationalist Society.  It is hard... Continue Reading →

IRiS leads research for WMCA Leadership Commission Report

The University of Birmingham’s Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS) has made a significant contribution to the West Midlands Combined Authority’s (WMCA) Leadership Commission Report 2018, launched by Andy Street CBE, the Mayor of the West Midlands, and presented at a city centre event on Thursday 14th June. The Commission’s report – Leaders Like You... Continue Reading →

The government’s hostile environment and its consequences on integration

By Jenny Phillimore (@japhillimore) and Nando Sigona (@nandosigona) Published in Discover Society's special issue responding to the UK Government’s Integrated Communities Strategy Green Paper, which was published on 14th  March with a deadline for responses of 5th June. The special issue  is available here as a pdf ] Can you have an integrated society in a hostile environment? The UK Government’s... Continue Reading →

From mobile citizens to migrants: joint event at the British Library

This event, organised by Eurochildren  and BrExpats and sponsored by The UK in a Changing Europe initiative, is free and open to the public but registration is required via Eventbrite

EU families & Eurochildren in Brexiting Britain

In the aftermath of the United Kingdom’s referendum on their continued membership of the European Union and the ongoing negotiations into the issue of citizens’ rights, EU27 nationals living in the UK and UK citizens living in the EU27, stand to see their legal status shift from that of mobile citizens to migrants. This has consequences in respect to the structures that support their continued residence and rights in the places that they have made their homes. It is becoming apparent that there are outstanding questions about who will be able to stay put and on what terms.

This roundtable to be held on 21 May, 2-5pm at the British Library (Eliot Room) is organised in collaboration by Eurochildren and BrExpats. It brings together an expert panel to seek to reposition this discussion within the broader context of conversations about migration and citizenship, from who is a migrant to…

View original post 60 more words

Thousands of children of EU parents at risk of falling through the cracks of Brexit, IRiS-led study reveals

Thousands EU citizens and their family members living in the UK under EU law are at risk of ‘falling through the cracks’, with their rights of future residence in question after Brexit, Eurochildren researchers say. In two Eurochildren Research Briefs published today on the impact of the UK-EU agreement on residence and citizenship rights for EU families,... Continue Reading →

Another dangerous ‘National Us’: you can’t have a more integrated society in a hostile environment | openDemocracy

Comment piece by Nando Sigona in openDemocracy. The UK Government’s strategy is not for an integrated society, focusing on what government and society could and should do, but for integrated 'communities', code word for everyone else. Source: Another dangerous ‘National Us’: you can’t have a more integrated society in a hostile environment | openDemocracy

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑